What Is Biohacking?

Biohacking is essentially the practice of changing our chemistry and our physiology through science and self-experimentation. It’s a broad definition, but that’s also because the idea of “biohacking” is constantly evolving. It can be as simple as lifestyle and dietary changes that improve the functioning of your body. It can be as daily as wearable technology that helps you monitor and regulate physiological data. Or it can be as extreme as implant technology and genetic engineering. The possibilities are endless, but they are all rooted in the idea that we can change our bodies and our brains, and that we can ultimately become smarter, faster, better.

The most well-known proponent of the prospect is Bulletproof founder Dave Asprey. In his guide to biohacking, he says,”The main thing that separates a biohacker from the rest of the self-improvement world is a systems-thinking approach to our own biology.”

If your body is a system, it’s got inputs (food, exercise, etc.) and outputs (energy, mood, etc.). Biohackers believe making constant tweaks to those inputs (like, really fine tuning them) can lead to immediate, measurable changes in the outputs.

In the biohacking ecosphere, you might see a lot of practices that many people swear by although the health benefits haven’t been confirmed by research. Biohackers generally don’t wait around for a peer-reviewed meta-analysis of a new therapy or approach. They try it themselves, see what happens, and make decisions from there.

So where do you begin? You can easily start using wearables like the FitBit or the Apple Watch. Or you could start experimenting with incorporating more foods that reduce inflammation. But if you’re ready for something new, and something different, consider one of these non-invasive biohacking approaches and see what benefits you.

Biohack

INTERMITTENT FASTING

Intermittent fasting is not a diet, it’s a pattern of eating. It’s a way of scheduling your meals so that you get the most out of them. Intermittent fasting doesn’t change what you eat, it changes when you eat.

I have been intermittent fasting for over one year. I skip breakfast each day and eat two meals, the first around 1pm and the second around 8pm. Then, I fast for 16 hours until I start eating again the next day at 1pm.

intermittent fasting

 

RED LIGHT THERAPY

Red light therapy is also known as photobiomodulation (PBM), low level light therapy (LLLT), biostimulation, photonic stimulation or light box therapy. Have you ever spent a lot of time indoors and begun to feel just a little…off? Our bodies and brains need light to function at their best. Not only does the sun give us an important dose of vitamin D, it helps us in a number of other physiological and emotional ways. But let’s look a little closer – specifically at the light wavelengths between 600 and 900 nanometers (nm). These specific wavelengths of red light create a biochemical affect in our cells that serves to increase mitochondrial function. This improves ATP (adenosine triphosphate) production in the body. How does this range of light waves impact our bodies?

Studies have shown that your body responds particularly well to red and near-infrared wavelengths, which range from 600 to 900 nm. Red therapy light penetrates about 8-10 millimeters into the skin. Depending on which area of the body the red light is used, this can easily affect all skin layers, reaching into blood vessels, lymph pathways, nerves, and hair follicles. At which point your mitochondrial chromophores absorb the photons. This in turn activates a number of nervous system and metabolic processes.

Red Light Therapy

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